Child Brain Evolution – Studying Brain Development Stages

Brain evolution in a child displays a marvelous period of brain development since birth to five – creating more than a million neural links every second.

The evolution of the child’s brain includes many factors that also include external factors such as the child’s relations, experiences and conditions. Recent research in child brain evaluations depicts the human brain areas that grow the most during childhood and adolescence are the same parts that developed the most during evolving as humans veered from other hominids. The brain evolution studies help to monitor the brain development process from the newborn stage to the brain-building process in following years.

The Evolution Phases

The evolution of the brain accelerates from the birth of the child. The brain transformation in the earliest year is rapid, and the visible signs are evident to the naked eyes. The evolution showcases results as a helpless infant quickly transform into a walking, talking child and develop skills such as reading, interactions and ability to think logically.

At birth, the size of the human brain is less than a quarter of the size of an adult human brain. However, 90 percent of all of the brain development and evolution takes place in the first five years of human life. As a child, a human brain evolves rapidly, and the size of the brain itself doubles in size in the first year after the birth of the child. The human mind keeps developing, and by the age of 3, the brain reaches 80 percent of the adult brain size and goes up to 90 percent, i.e., almost full grown by the age of five.

Prenatal Development of Brain From Prenatal Stage to Birth
Prebirth for the brain developments, a process of brain evolution starts, but it is at an initial development phase, and the birth of the infant sees a brain with a complicated arrangement of more than 100 billion neurons. While the structure of the brain nerve cells starts with the prenatal stages; however, these nerve cells are in links during the prenatal period, and the rapid evolution begins after birth.

From birth to the time the child turns three, the brain undergoes a complete connection of neurons, and functional architecture of the brain formation occurs. These stages the child takes into account all the sensory experiences such as sounds, smell and voices, and that brings the brain nerve cells in connection. From birth to the age of three, the brain forms more than 1,000 trillion synapses in reply to environmental inducements like visions, noises and tastes. Due to these neural links a rigid system of neural connections shapes up in the formation of brain functions.

When the child turns three, the brain continues to build neural connections and begin to interact and respond to the new learning experience. This evolution phase is the time when the child reaches a brain development stage that enables them to talk correctly, display different emotional reactions and develop motor coordination of the body parts. Starting from age three and up to age 11, the brain neural system is at its most responsive levels and this decade of life is the time where the child has the brain ability to learn many new skills that become difficult at an adult age.

When a child turns 11 years of age, the brain starts to dock away from the excess neural networks where the most related neural pathways continue and become an active component of the grown-up brain structure, but little-used neural networks fade.

From ages 11 to 13, the brain starts to evolve into the ability of performing logical thoughts, improved memory and more complex problem solving. At this age, children are able to look at things in different ways and realize that there is more to some situations than just what is on the surface level.

The evolution of the human brain since childhood is a fantastic study that sees the initial stage of neural cells formation and leading to strong neural networks of complete brain development.

Originally posted on Katy Trail Weekly. Read the original article here.